Working beyond 65?  
Retiring at 65?

Do I have to enroll in 
Original Medicare?

Most people who plan to keep working beyond age 65 and will continue to have 

employer-sponsored coverage are not required to enroll in Original Medicare Parts A and B when they turn 65. Check with your benefits administrator to see if your employer requires you to enroll in Medicare Part A or Part B. 

Enrolling in Part B after 65

Plan ahead--Once you are ready to take your Medicare Part B, you will need to notify Social Security. 

Is enrollment required?

Most people are not required to enroll in Medicare when they turn 65. Check with your benefits 
administrator to see if your employer requires you to enroll in Medicare Part A or Part B.

Are you ready?

If you’re ready for retirement, you will be eligible for Original Medicare (Parts A and B) and other Medicare plans when you turn 65. If you don’t have employer-sponsored coverage, you should consider 

enrolling during your Initial Enrollment Period. 


You can enroll any time within the three months before your 65th birthday month, the month of your 

birthday and three months after.

Change is good

Health care needs can change from year to year. Be sure to review your needs (upcoming surgeries, current prescription drugs, new wellness goals) so you can find a plan to best meet them. You can change your plan once a year during the Open Enrollment Period (OEP). The OEP is a seven-week period from Oct 15 through Dec 7. 

Are you retiring when you turn 65.....

Or will you decide to stay in the workforce? Either way, you may be eligible for Medicare?


WORKING BEYOND 65


Choices when working past 65

If you choose to work past age 65, you have choices when it comes to Medicare . Many 

people choose to enroll in only Medicare Part A (hospital coverage) because there’s no 

monthly premium . They may delay enrolling in Part B (medical expenses) until they 

lose their employer-sponsored coverage, because Part B has a monthly premium based 

on income . You can choose to enroll in both Parts A and B, but check with your benefits 

administrator and review your budget to understand how it would work with the coverage 

you have today . 


Beginning with the basic coverage

Many people who choose to work past age 65 enroll only in Part A because there is no monthly premium.  Some choose to enroll in both Parts A and B together (Original Medicare). However, Part B comes with a monthly premium based on your income, so many do not enroll in Part B until they lose or choose to drop employer-sponsored coverage.


What if you HAVE an individual health plan?

If you don’t have employer-sponsored health insurance and instead pay independently 

for your health plan, you could save money if you enroll in Original Medicare and 

switch from your individual plan to a Medicare health plan . Find out what’s available 

in your area.


Compare coverage--Save money

  • If you have an individual health plan, a Medicare plan could help you save money on your health care expenses 

• If you have health insurance through your employer, a Medicare plan could work with your employer-sponsored coverage. Check with your benefits administrator and independent agent to see if it makes sense for you to sign up for Original Medicare (Parts A and B) in addition to the coverage you get today


RETIRING AT 65?


Planning for retirement at 65 and your Medicare coverage?
If you’re planning to retire at age 65, you can enroll in Original Medicare and, for extra coverage, a Medicare plan within two months after your employer-sponsored coverage ends. 

Apply early to avoid a lapse in health coverage. If you wait, you may be without coverage until the next Open Enrollment Period. If you don’t have employer-sponsored coverage, consider enrolling in both Original Medicare and a Medicare plan within three months of your 65th birthday. Apply before the month you turn 65 so your coverage becomes effective at the beginning of your birthday month.   

Review your coverage each year
Health care needs can change from year to year.  Be sure to review your current needs (upcoming surgeries, prescription drugs, new wellness goals) so you can find a plan to best meet them.  You can change your plan at least once a year during open enrollment, typically between October 15th and December 7th.  

GOING FORWARD--WHAT TO DO NEXT

If you continue working:

  • Check with your benefits administrator to see how Original Medicare would work with your current plan, and if it makes sense to enroll in a Medicare Part B plan
  • Keep your health insurance coverage records so you can prove that you had creditable coverage past your Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) for Medicare
  • If your spouse or dependents need coverage, they could be eligible for COBRA
  • Check with your benefits administrator for more information when you get ready to retire

If you are retiring:

  • Talk with your employer’s benefits administrator to see if you and/or your dependents can get employer-sponsored retiree benefits

• If you don’t have retiree coverage available, sign up for Original Medicare (Parts A and B) and review the Medicare plans in your area

• If your spouse or dependents need coverage, they could be eligible for COBRA

• Check with your benefits administrator before you retire to fi nd out how to sign up for COBRA

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